Syngenta researcher named fellow of National Academy of Inventors

Syngenta scientist Mary-Dell Chilton was recently honored as a National Academy of Inventors fellow.
Syngenta scientist Mary-Dell Chilton was recently honored as a National Academy of Inventors fellow.
Syngenta scientist Mary-Dell Chilton was recently honored as a National Academy of Inventors fellow for her work in plant biotechnology.

The distinction is given to inventors who have made a significant impact on society.

In 1983, Chilton's groundbreaking research helped produce the first transgenic plant which pioneered the field of agricultural biotechnology. This has led to increased global agricultural productivity with farmers planting almost 450 million acres of biotech crops across 28 countries just last year.

Chilton has been recognized for her work many times over the years. She was named a 2013 World Food Prize laureate, which acknowledges those who have enhanced the quality, quantity or availability of food around the world. Her more recent accolades include being inducted into the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Hall of Heroes and the 2015 National Inventors Hall of Fame.

"My career in biotechnology has been an exciting journey, and I am amazed to see the progress we have made over the years," Chilton said. "My hope is that through continued scientific discoveries, we will be able to provide a brighter and better future for the generations that follow us. I am proud of my efforts and my Syngenta colleagues’ continued drive to innovate new ways to deliver solutions to farmers."

Organizations in this story

Syngenta Basel, Switzerland

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