Syngenta receives judgment against Plant Variety Protection Act violators

The illegal seed trade, known as "brown bagging," has seen an increase recently in popularity of the SY Wolf seed. | File photo

Paul and John Mayclin of Mayclin Farms in Plankinton, South Dakota must pay $25,000 to Syngenta after admitting to unauthorized sales of Syngenta’s AgriPro winter wheat variety SY Wolf, a violation of the Plant Variety Protection Act.

The PVP Act protects seed developers and allows them to take legal action when their seed is sold, re-sold or used to produce seed without permission.

“We owe it to our seed associates and producers who follow the law and buy their certified seed legally to prevent illegal use of our federally protected seed,” Darcy Pawlik, product marketing lead for Syngenta’s cereals business, said. “We must stop illegal use of our genetics if we are to have a forward-looking seed industry with continued improvements in good quality grain.”

The illegal seed trade, known as "brown bagging," has seen an increase recently in popularity of the SY Wolf seed in which originally debuted in 2011, especially in South Dakota and surrounding areas. 

Syngenta and other seed producers pledge to continue taking legal action against PVP Act violators in order to recover lost profits that could be used for continued research through Farm Yield Initiative.

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